Hair Removal Guide

Welcome to the wild word of Hair Removal.
This site was designed as a tool for anyone looking to learn more about the different types of hair removal, and how to perform them.

4/18/2006

Razor Burn

Razor burn is the tiny red bumps that can appear after shaving, from a few minutes to a few hours later.
Razor burn is caused by the razor skimming off the top layers of skin. This exfoliation can be good for your skin, but if you shave too close your skin becomes exposed and sensitive, and more susceptible to irritation or even infection.
If you find your skin feeling sensitive and painful, here are some tips.

RAZOR BURN - PREVENTING
  • Use a fresh razor. A dirty razor is much more likely to introduce bacteria to your exposed skin, and subsequently causing irritation and infection.
  • If you are nicking yourself frequently, slow down or stop. This is a sign that you're shaving too close and are removing protective layers of skin.
  • Use a shaving cream or gel. Some people find one works better than the other for preventing razor burn, do some experimenting and find out which is best for you.
  • Avoid activities that will cause you to sweat immediately after shaving. The acidity and bacteria in your sweat can sting and irritate your skin.
  • Put on fresh clean clothes after shaving.
  • Shave slowly and carefully, without pressing down on the razor too much. You may even want to shave with the grain to avoid cutting too close.
  • Take a hot shower before shaving. If your skin is clean there is less chance of infection.
RAZOR BURN - TREATING
  • A cool shower can be soothing to irritated skin.
  • An antiseptic cream can treat infection.
  • There are aftershaves available designed for sensitive skin. They don't contain alcohol or any irritants, and can usually provide immediate relief from razor burn.

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